The Early Bird Catches the Worm but the Late Worm Does Not Get Eaten

In Ralph F. Berdie’s book, After High School– What? , he discusses who chooses to go to college and why they choose to do so. In this book, there is a chapter on high school seniors’ plans after they graduate. They also mentioned that parent attitudes toward college played a very important role in students’ decisions about attending college. A lot of my sources were similar to this book and I might use it as a central base for my paper.

I found a scanned copy of The Saturday Evening Post, which I thought was kind of cool. It emphasized the importance of college education in the U.S. Characteristics of students who should not go to college, significance of attending college, and the quality of college education in the country.

Another article from EBSCO Host discussed that students should go to college in order to succeed in society as an adult, but that students do not get the correct information about what is required to succeed in higher education. The author explains that the knowledge and skills that are taught in high schools are different from college entrance and placement requirements. It provided charts and diagrams that I found interesting like popular misconceptions about college versus realities.

I found an article that related most to one of my Cracked articles and it may potentially be helpful when I start writing my paper. It is the author’s belief that students should not have to feel pressure to go to college, and instead explore positive alternatives. The author suggests that a student takes a year after high school to travel or work.”

I know these aren’t too many sources but I changed the format in which I planned to write my paper, which changed the amount of sources that would be useful.

Better Late Than Never…

Working in the library was extremely frustrating. It was unhelpful to my research and only surfaced challenges. Being in the library had me like this:

When asked to find sources to present from the library, I thought it would be easiest to go online to the library’s website and find some articles to print off. I don’t know if I was in the wrong place or what but every time I thought I found something that could be useful, I hit a dead end and could not even open the document. After trying this a few times, I gave up and decided to find a book in the library, just like in the old days. So I adjusted my search on the library website to find sources in the main library (because that’s where I was) and even that took a minute. Once I got the call numbers, I headed upstairs in search of these books and I was on my own because nobody that works in the library hangs out up there. Long story short, I could not find any of the books because they were not where they were supposed to be. I ended up finding a few others that had to do with education but they mostly focused on high school or lower education, just so I had something to show for the day. After I presented these books, I just dropped them in the book return and left.

None of the sources I found from the library were helpful or essential to my research topic so I doubt I will be using any for my paper.

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

The pressures are on. College admission is not what it used to be. Getting good grades used to be all it took and being involved wouldn’t have hurt either. Nowadays being in clubs is a must and having additional academic achievements is strongly encouraged. Personally, I didn’t have a problem getting into college but before the time came for me to actually apply, everyone made it seem like a bigger deal than it actually was.

Getting to college was easy, paying for college is where it got complicated. In high school, it was all about going to college, that was the plan, so that it what I was focused on. Once I got here, I realized my plan for paying tuition, room and board, meal plan, etc. was not so thought out. Three cheers for my enrollment hold due to not having paid bursar bill! Yeah, I applied for scholarships and took out a couple loans but it’s still not enough…

When I enrolled in June, I sat down with an advisor, who helped me choose my major. I told her what I thought I wanted to do as a career and she said StratCom was the way to go. To be completely honest, I can not remember what I told her. With that being said, I have no idea what I’ll be using my degree for, I’m just kind of winging it. But hey, I know I still have plenty of time to figure all of that out so I’m not tripping. Worrying comes later.

Honestly so far, the most interesting article I have found so far is my Cracked article. Everything since then has been dull compared to it. I really liked the video I found that I inserted a few posts back because it covered pretty much all the pros and cons of attending college in about 3 minutes. However a YouTube video is not an article.

Polo

When we were in the library on Friday, I was reminded of high school. Every year, we would go to the library and the librarian would show us how to find sources. EBSCO Host was one of them so finding articles through the databases was pretty easy. By the way, did it bother anyone else that she kept spelling ‘Hurricane’ without the e, or was it just me?

The first article I found was a scanned copy of The Saturday Evening Post, which I thought was kind of cool. It emphasized the importance of college education in the U.S. Characteristics of students who should not go to college, significance of attending college, and the quality of college education in the country. (I pulled that from the abstract)

The second article I found on EBSCO discussed that students should go to college in order to succeed in society as an adult, but that students do not get the correct information about what is required to succeed in higher education. The author explains that the knowledge and skills that are taught in high schools are different from college entrance and placement requirements. It provided charts and diagrams that I found interesting like popular misconceptions about college versus realities.

The third article I found related most to one of my Cracked articles and it may potentially be helpful when I start writing my paper. “The author discusses his belief that sometimes students should not go to college right after they graduate high school. The author points out that there are times when students either drop out of college in their first year, or they switch to a community college closer to home. It is the author’s belief that students should not have to feel pressure to go to college, and instead explore positive alternatives. The author suggests that a student takes a year after high school to travel or work.”

Steven Seagal - Penicillin  found that in my gap year

So far, it seems that most of my sources contain the same information so I’m starting to wonder if I have enough to write a paper. I’m trying to find more information about the factors that effect students’ choice to attend college such as expenses, authority influences, etc. So that’s where my research is headed.

Marco

When we were in the library on Friday, I was reminded of high school. Every year, we would go to the library and the librarian would show us how to find sources. EBSCO Host was one of them so finding articles through the databases was pretty easy. By the way, did it bother anyone else that she kept spelling ‘Hurricane’ without the e, or was it just me? The first article I found was a scanned copy of The Saturday Evening Post, which I thought was kind of cool. It emphasized the importance of college education in the U.S. Characteristics of students who should not go to college, significance of attending college, and the quality of college education in the country. (I pulled that from the abstract) The second article I found on EBSCO discussed that students should go to college in order to succeed in society as an adult, but that students do not get the correct information about what is required to succeed in higher education. The author explains that the knowledge and skills that are taught in high schools are different from college entrance and placement requirements. It provided charts and diagrams that I found interesting like popular misconceptions about college versus realities. The third article I found related most to one of my Cracked articles and it may potentially be helpful when I start writing my paper. “The author discusses his belief that sometimes students should not go to college right after they graduate high school. The author points out that there are times when students either drop out of college in their first year, or they switch to a community college closer to home. It is the author’s belief that students should not have to feel pressure to go to college, and instead explore positive alternatives. The author suggests that a student takes a year after high school to travel or work.”

Do I Have To…?

A friend of mine who is currently in school to become a teacher recently informed me that nowadays, the only requirement a person needs to become a teacher is to simply take a test. This was crazy to me! Even my mom, who was a substitute teacher, had to take a course in order to have her own classes. If this is true, what does this say about who has been educating us? If we went to school being taught to go to college by someone who just took a test giving them permission to teach us that, why should we listen?

In my previous blog post, the references were from a book. In this book, there is a chapter on high school seniors’ plans after they graduate. Their studies were broken up into gender, and of those who planned on working after graduation and those who planned on going to school. Of the girls, their studies were broken down even further to which chose to become nurses or go to business school. They also mentioned that parent attitudes toward college played a very important role in students’ decisions about attending college.

College or Nah?

Part of the problem with the public school system is that it does not fully prepare its students for the future. Sure, that’s what they’re selling but by the time they graduate, it’s basically “Good luck with whatever it is you choose to do with your life!” and expect them to have an idea. For some who do, great! Off to college they go, but what about the rest?  In Ralph F. Berdie’s book, After High School– What? , he discusses who chooses to go to college and why they choose to do so.

For those who plan on becoming medical doctors, lawyers, or engineers, college is obviously the right direction for them. However, those who are not pursuing a professional degree might want to consider how they plan on using their degree, the total amount of money they will be spending at the end of it, and if the time put in will be worth as much as they make later in life.

 

Useless Knowledge

When the author of my article realized that cursive was still being taught in schools, they were stunned. They mentioned that they have never used cursive in their life after school and come to think of it, I have not either. The most common uses of cursive, that I’ve noticed, is on fancy, cutesy tattoos. It was a nice thing to learn but essentially useless. This finding caused the author to wonder what other outdated practices that are still taught in school.

 

4 Ways Your Education Was a Conspiracy to Make You Bored

This article stood out to me because being bored in school is one of my specialties. It talked about how the interesting stuff is left out of textbooks and the things put in textbooks do not prepare us for anything. Teachers are under paid, unsupported, and stressed out. The author strongly feels that we need an education revolution and I agree.

This second article stood out to me because it is something I have thought about a few times. Is college really as important as it is made out to be if one is not interested in going into fields such as medicine, law, or engineering? This question made me think about it because I am not going to college for any of those three things. I’m not sure how I can link this to the first article that I found but I think it could add an interesting spin to my research.